A stop at D.C.’s African American museum

Students have returned from their social justice trip to Washington D.C., but we have more stories to share! Catch up with other participants’ stories about Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the Holocaust Museum, the Lincoln Memorial, and the U.S. Supreme Court and Ford’s Theatre.

First up, Nathaly Diaz, a pre-engineering student …

I decided to go on this trip to D.C. because my advisor said it would be an awesome opportunity and a way to gain leadership skills. I was really excited to learn more about social justice and be able to apply it in my life and find ways I can help.

That’s me flashing the peace sign.

We went to places like the National Museum of African American History & Culture and looked at monuments around the National Mall. The African American museum had so much history in it, like the struggles of slavery and civil rights. It was very emotional and inspirational. We were also able to see African American culture–life, music, art, etc.

This quote at the museum, in particular, moved me.

… and Lorena Ceballos Chavez, a business administration student.

I signed up to come to D.C. with Ivy Tech Northeast because I’ve always wanted to know more about American history. Every monument and museum in D.C. has a particular meaning and an amazing story. As a business student, I need to have a general cultural knowledge about so much, especially U.S. culture.

Click on the images for caption info and to zoom.

I was amazed to see how the bad actions against race repeat themselves throughout the history of many countries. This photo (above right) from the Holocaust Museum depicts concentration camp life and reminds me of what German Nazis did to the Jews.

FDR’s words & the Holocaust Museum

Eleven Ivy Tech Northeast students and recent graduates have spent the last few days in Washington D.C. with three chaperones on a social justice trip. They made stops at attractions like the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, and other spots related to social justice. Students are taking turns sharing their thoughts with Green Light. Follow along with the group’s experiences on social media with #ivyFW2DC.

Two students are sharing their thoughts today. First up: McKayla Smith, a business administration student …

I signed up to go on the D.C. trip with Ivy Tech Northeast because I wanted to learn more about social justice. I am the president of the Campus Activities Board, and there are many things to think about when planning events for students at Ivy Tech. I think learning about different ethnicities and races is something that will benefit me in that role.

This quote and picture that we took at the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial is important to me. There is so much hate in the world, and by choosing the path of social justice, we choose love and support. The subject of this photo moves me because this is what our whole trip is about: We are learning so much about how people with different backgrounds or races are treated so differently than others. This shows that social justice can make this a better world.

… and Alondra Campos, an education student.

I signed up to go to D.C. with Ivy Tech Northeast because I wanted to learn more about history and social justice. I thought the focus of this trip would benefit my future as a teacher.  Social justice and history continue to effect our lives, and the more we know about history, the less likely we will repeat the bad things that have happened. It’s important for students to learn about historical events and  acquire knowledge about the people who fought for our country. Future generations must must learn about the importance of equality and respecting others regardless of their cultural background. Knowledge is a powerful source in this world.

That’s me in the lower left corner.

I took this photo (at right) in the Holocaust Museum. The picture portrays a wall with images of Holocaust victims. This part of the museum made me very emotional; I couldn’t believe how wide and tall the wall was.

The people on that wall were only a few of the many who suffered in the Holocaust. There were pictures of children and families, and for a moment, it made me think about my family. I couldn’t image my parents or siblings going through this experience. I realized I needed to appreciate my family more. I also realized I am blessed with the life I have.

Day 2 in DC: Looking forward to Lincoln

Right now, 11 Ivy Tech Northeast students and recent graduates are traveling around Washington D.C. with three chaperones on a social justice trip. They are making stops at attractions like the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, and other spots related to social justice. During their trip, students are taking turns sharing their thoughts with Green Light. Follow along with the group’s experiences on social media with #ivyFW2DC.

DAY 2

Here I am (left) with Lisa Beringer, an assistant professor of Social Sciences at Ivy Tech Northeast.

I am Juanita New, and I am a business administration student. I signed up for the trip because I thought it would be a wonderful way to learn more about social justice. Also, I would get a chance to see the Lincoln Memorial.

The Lincoln Memorial represents social justice for all. Not only did Lincoln give the Emancipation Proclamation (which granted freedom to the slaves in the Confederate States if the States did not return to the Union by Jan. 1, 1863, according to the Civil War Trust), but Martin Luther King Jr. gave his “I Have a Dream” speech from the top of the stairs. There is a plaque placed in the spot where King stood during his speech.

This monument means so much to many people from all walks of life.

Check out the post from Day 1 here. We’ll pick up with the students’ thoughts on the trip and D.C. on Monday. Stay tuned!

The outside of the Lincoln Memorial

 

Ivy Tech goes to DC!

Right now, 11 students or recent graduates are traveling around Washington D.C. with three chaperones on a social justice trip. They are making stops to spots like the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, and other spots related to social justice. During their trip, students are taking turns sharing their thoughts with Green Light.

First up: Emerald Bentley, who graduated with her associate degree in nursing on Friday (CONGRATS, EMMY!) Follow along with the group’s experiences on social media with #ivyFW2DC.

I have been an active student since beginning at Ivy Tech Northeast, but during the last year of my degree, I haven’t been able to participate as much. My husband recently enrolled in classes at Ivy Tech, and when I saw the Washington D.C. trip, I thought it would be a great way for us both to get involved.

I was raised a middle class, white chick from rural Indiana. I moved to Fort Wayne as a freshman in high school. At my first high school, there would have been 27 in my graduating class; in Fort Wayne, there were 525. I had major culture shock!

I’ve always believed I am a good person. I try to do right by others, but I want to be able to have the hard conversations. I want to be able to ask questions without causing offense. This trip helps with this, highlighting different people with different experiences and different stories. I truly believe we are more similar than we are different.

DAY 1

Yesterday was our first full day in the D.C. And boy were we busy!

Sen. Joe Donnelly in his Ivy Tech gear.

We jumped on public transport (something none of use are super familiar with) and headed to the Capital. We met one of our senators, Joe Donnelly. We had coffee with him and his staff. They answered our questions and gave us some great recommendations of things to do and see in D.C. After coffee, we went on a tour of Congress. We got to see both the House and Senate while in session, and we saw Donnelly speak.

Then it was off to the Supreme Court. Of everything on the agenda, this was one of the buildings I was most excited to see: This building houses all the major court decisions for the last 100-ish years. Court was in session, so we were not able to tour the chambers, but being there was so awesome!

The Supreme Court of the United States

After the Supreme Court we headed over to Ford’s Theatre. It was eerie being in the same place that President Lincoln was shot–seriously, just a few seats away! We saw the play “Ragtime,” which is from the perspective of three groups of people in the early 1900s. The language was rough: They used words we consider unacceptable.

Click on the image to zoom and for caption info.

Over all yesterday, I marked several things off my bucket list.  Washington D.C. is a must-visit for any American.  This is our city, and the people here work for us. I think we sometimes forget that.

Edible Book Fest No. 11 is in the books

Today was Ivy Tech Northeast’s 11th annual Edible Book Festival, our local take on the international event to celebrate a love of books … and food. Students and community members picked a book and created an edible version of it, resulting in cakes, veggie trains, cookies, and more.

Melinda Allen, a cake decorator at the Chapel Ridge Walmart, says this is the seventh Edible Book Festival she has participated in. Or eighth. Or ninth. “I’ve done so many,” she says. “I look forward to it every year.” Her cake, based on the book “Vintage Camper Trailers,” came in third place in the People’s Choice award.

Three participants were honored with People’s Choice awards:

3. Melinda Allen, community participant, “Vintage Camper Trailers”
2. American Heritage Girls, community participant, the Harry Potter books
1. Natasha Grover, hospitality administration student, “Beauty and the Beast”

Everything on Melinda Allen’s camper was edible. The trees had ice cream cone bases, she said, and the hot dogs were stringy fruit snacks.

Click on the image to zoom and for complete caption information.

Help us name our food truck!

This spring, Fort Wayne will be getting a new food truck to feed the masses–and Ivy Tech food truck! It’s set to debut this spring, and we want YOUR help naming it.

Nooooo, that’s not the Ivy Tech food truck … it’s just a cute one to show you!

You should be creative with your name. Be edgy, be silly. Play with puns. Make us laugh. And don’t worry about the name fitting the type of food offered at the food truck, because the menu will change regularly. You might be able to order pierogies or pizza, sushi or sandwiches, tacos or soup.

And if your idea is chosen? You’ll win $100 in prizes: an Amazon Echo Dot AND a $50 gift certificate to use at the food truck.

Fill out the online entry form to submit a name idea (all the rules are listed there, too), and feel free to enter more than one idea–just be sure to submit one form per idea.

Help us stuff a bus & get free Komets tix

How would you like to go to a Komets game for free this week? All you need to do is make a canned or nonperishable food donation.

This week, Ivy Tech Northeast is partnering with area businesses for Bus Stuff, a community project to collect food for Community Harvest Food Bank. Just for donating, you’ll receive two free Komets tickets to a game this week (while tickets last). Games are

  • 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, which is Deuces Wild Night (that means beer and pop are $2)
  • 7:30 p.m. Saturday
  • 5 p.m. Sunday

Last year, Ivy Tech Northeast collected 547 pounds of food for Bus Stuff! Help us be that successful this year, too.

The collection bucket is in the marketing office, room CC1440 on Coliseum Campus. Stop in to drop off your food, and pick up your tickets from Jaclyn Garver (that’s me!) or Dane Hawley (both of our offices are inside CC1440).

We’ll take any nonperishable food, but please note: Community Harvest REEEEEALLY wants canned protein. Think peanut butter, salmon, tuna, chicken, spam, and the like. The food bank will also accept monetary donations online. If you donate online, be sure to print out your PayPal receipt to show to receive your Komets tickets.

Bus Stuff runs from March 20 to 26.

Happy spring break! What are your plans?

Even though spring doesn’t officially start until March 20, Ivy Tech Northeast gets a jump on the season next week. We asked students to share their Spring Break plans so those of us not going anywhere can live vicariously through them. (Which means we’re probably going to Texas … I had no idea the Lone Star State was the place to be for Spring Break!)

Powell

“I will be flying to Dallas. From there, I will go to a bachelor party for the first weekend. Then I will begin my road trip to South Padre Island, Texas, for the week, making a stop in Austin for some fun.” ~Jeffrey Powell, business administration student (at right)

*

“I will be heading to Texas to visit my sister at the Air Force base. Then I’ll head to Louisiana for a couple days, then to Nashville before returning home.” ~Kaitlyn Enfield, agriculture student

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“For spring break, I’m planning on just staying at home while spending time with my mom, my boyfriend, his daughter, and my nephew.” ~Katlyn Green, business administration student (below)

Green


Speith

“I plan to work during spring break. Go to a networking party! Explore my artistic abilities!” ~Aaron Michael Speith, hospitality administration student (at right)

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“I will be going to Texas for spring break to take my 13-year-old son to see his older sister, whom he has not seen in eight years. I am very excited! I cannot wait for this so-much-needed reunion/vacation.” ~Tabatha Jackson, medical assisting student (below)

Jackson


Allison Erbach, a human services student, is planning to go to the movies with friends over spring break.

“I will be staying here in Fort Wayne and helping out my grandparents since my grandma will be recovering from surgery. There is also a good chance that I will sleep a good bit!” ~Elizabeth Owen, healthcare specialist student (below)

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“My plans for Spring Break 2017 are to visit with family and friends, talk about the past few weeks’ experiences, and having a good time. I will get some work done as well to be sure I stay on top of it all!” ~Alec Christopher Marin, visual communications student (below)

 

Nenita Allmaras, a healthcare specialist student, plans to study, clean the whole house, have fun with her children, and visit with friends.

“My spring break plans are going to Shipshewana, and going to Toledo to help out with my cousin’s kid’s school carnival.” ~Julie McDermitt, early childhood education student (below)

McDermitt

Have you grabbed your kindness cards yet?

As a part of Black History Month, the College is also celebrating Random Acts of Kindness this February. Boards are up in the Student Life Center and Coliseum Campus to give you some ideas.

Click on images to zoom and for caption info.

How does it work?

  1. Check out the board.
  2. Pick a card or two that appeals to you. Maybe you want to be a little more polite in traffic or leave a huge tip for a server. Maybe you want to share a genuine compliment with someone or visit someone who might be lonely.
  3. Perform the act. Then, if you want, share about it on social media with #IvyRAOK and #IvyTech.

Click on images above to zoom.

Want some other ideas? Buzzfeed shared 101, and the Random Acts of Kindness Foundation even breaks it down by area–acts you can do at work, during the holidays, at school, with your family, and the like.

What are some of your favorite ideas?

Continue reading

More than 6,000 marriages in the U.S. a day, & other V-day stats

Love is a many splendored thing.

or

Love is a dog from hell.

Whether you agree with Paul Francis Webster (the splendored song writer) or Charles Bukowski (the dog-from-hell poet), Valentine’s Day is a multi-million dollar industry. History.com has some pretty fascinating by-the-numbers facts on it (no matter your view on the subject).

25.7: Pounds of candy consumed per American per year

34: Number of single men 65 or older for every 100 single women 65 or older

57 and 60: Percent of American women and men, respectively, 15 and older who are currently married

119: Number of single men in their 20s for every 100 single women in their 20s

6,000: Number of marriages a day in the United States

43,322: Number of Americans employed at chocolate companies

141 million: Number of cards exchanged on Valentine’s Day

And then, here’s just one more number for you …

4: Number of valentines below for you to print out and give to your favorite people

valentine-card