Thanksgiving in America vs. Thanksgiving in Canada

This week, Americans throughout this country will celebrate in the national feast that will assure they’re comatose in front of the television by early evening.

Though the American Thanksgiving celebrates the pilgrims’ harvest celebration in Plymouth, Mass., the holidays is celebrated in Canada, too.

Here’s how they differ:

  United States Canada
Date Fourth Thursday in November Second Monday in October (when the U.S. celebrates Columbus Day)
Name Thanksgiving Thanksgiving or Action de Grâce, in French
Reason To celebrate the 1621 pilgrim and Native American harvest in Plymouth, Mass. To celebrate the harvest and other blessings of the year
Originated Since 1863, when President Lincoln proclaimed a national day of “Thanksgiving and praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens” Though celebration officially began in 1879, the Parliament of Canada proclaimed in 1957 that the holiday would be “A Day of General Thanksgiving to Almighty God for the bountiful harvest with which Canada has been blessed”
Football This year’s Thanksgiving Day Classic, a double header between four Canadian Football League teams
Parade Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade While parades can be part of the Canadian celebration, they’re not common
Food Turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy, stuffing, cranberries, pumpkin pie, and whatever Mom made while you were growing up Similar to the American celebration, though the star of the dish may be baked ham, salmon, or wild game

Share your favorite Thanksgiving memory or tradition in the comments, and hope your Thanksgiving is a wonderful one! Green Light will take a break Friday to celebrate the harvest–see you Dec. 5. The end of the semester is in sight!

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