Did you know pinatas came from China?

Here I thought piñatas were just a candy-filled toy for birthday parties.

¡G.O.A.L. y Amigos!, the College’s Latino student organization, hosted a Piñata Party yesterday afternoon, and it started with some education. You think you know piñatas? You do not, my friend!

pinata

The candy-filled cone started out as part of the piñata, representing one of the seven deadly sins. The students are G.O.A.L members. From left: Gustavo Figueroa, a visual communications student; Indira Lucero-Palma, an exploratory student; and Candy Lucero, G.O.A.L. president and nursing student.

Candy Lucero, G.O.A.L. president, and Brayan Castillo, G.O.A.L. vice president, gave the piñata lowdown: For one, piñatas originated in China. Marco Polo brought them back to Spain, and the Spanish took them to Central and South America, where they were used as a tool to convert the native people to Christianity.

A traditional piñata is round with seven cones on the surface. Each cone represents one of the seven deadly sins: pride, envy, wrath, gluttony, lust, sloth, or greed. Before someone can try to break open the piñata with a bat, which represents the Bible, she is blindfolded–which represents faith in God–and spun around three times–because the devil is a trickster. While the poor blindfolded soul tries to whack away at a piñata she can’t see, everyone can “help” by shouting, “To the right!” or “To the left!” But they might be lying–because that’s what the devil does.

The Piñata Party was part of G.O.A.L.’s celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month.

After the piñata broke, the Piñata Party turned into a dance party. Click on the photos to zoom and for caption info.

College to host its largest fundraiser Nov. 5

DETAILS:
Ivy Tech Community College Northeast is hosting its fifth annual A Reason to Taste fundraiser this year. The theme centers around The Rome of France, giving guests a taste of Nimes, the French city with Italian heritage.

Brenda Zemaitis, at left, and Teresa Thurston are two of the winners of 2016’s European Competition. They traveled to France in May to study the culinary arts.

Brenda Zemaitis, at left, and Teresa Thurston are two of the winners of 2016’s European Competition. They traveled to France in May to study the culinary arts.

The dinner will be prepared by hospitality administration students and graduates who won the European Competition in January. Their prize was a trip to Europe to study the culinary arts. The students created the menu based upon their trip.

Tickets are available online at IvyTech.edu/reason or by contacting Kelli Brandenberger at kbrandenberger@ivytech.edu or 260-481-2243.

Businesses interested in donating an item for the silent auction can also do so through the above link.

Parkview Health is A Reason to Taste’s presenting sponsor. Plumbers & Steamfitters Local Union 166 is the event’s reception sponsor. Calhoun Street Soups, Salads, & Spirits is its beverage sponsor. The corporate sponsors are Barnes & Thornburg, C&A Tool Engineering, Inc., Chuck & Lisa Surack and Sweetwater Sound, Frontier Communications, Greater Fort Wayne, Hagerman Construction, Ivy Tech Foundation, Lincoln Financial, PNC Bank, and Whitley Manufacturing. ABC 21 WPTA and Fort Wayne’s NBC are the media sponsors.

WHEN:
6 p.m. Nov. 5
Dinner begins at 7 p.m.

WHERE:
For the first time, A Reason to Taste will be hosted at The Mirro Center for Research and Innovation
10622 Parkview Plaza Drive
Fort Wayne, IN 46845

Ivy Tech Northeast’s Automotive Technology program receives accreditation for collision repair, refinishing services

The National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation recently issued master accreditation for collision repair and refinishing services to Ivy Tech Community College Northeast’s Automotive Technology program. The program already maintains master accreditation for automobile services.

NATEF is a nonprofit organization that aims to improve the quality of automotive technician training programs at secondary, post-secondary, public and proprietary schools nationwide.

“Accreditation is a very labor intensive process that involves composing more than 1,000 pages of documentation, evaluation by an advisory board, evaluation by third-party individuals and support by college administration,” says Nick Goodnight, Ivy Tech Northeast automotive technology instructor and project lead on the accreditation process.

According to NATEF’s website, accreditation provides credibility, prestige and recognition to select automotive training programs. Schools benefit from potential enrollment and funding increases; students benefit from access to high-quality programs and solid career opportunities; employers benefit from highly trained entry-level technicians and connections with accredited schools.

“Our auto body repair concentration is now one of only two NATEF-accredited options in Indiana,” says Jaron Grayless, automotive technology instructor. “This recognition is not only an endorsement of the caliber of our faculty, but it’s one that will serve our students well as they begin their careers.”

Earlier this year, Ivy Tech Northeast’s Automotive Technology program achieved additional accolades. The American Technical Education Association named it the country’s 2016 Outstanding Technical Program. Also, the College entered into a partnership with Fiat Chrysler Automobile’s Mopar Career Automotive Program, or Mopar CAP, to create a next-generation employment pipeline for Mopar-certified automotive technicians who will service Chrysler, Dodge, Fiat, Jeep and Ram vehicles.

For more information on the Automotive Technology program, contact its chair, Bob Huffman, at 260-481-2247 or visit IvyTech.edu/automotive-technology.

 

Tuesday is National Voter Registration Day

Tuesday is National Voter Registration Day.

Of course voting is important, all our voices count, each vote matters, yada yada. You’ve heard it before, but a story like Saudi Arabia’s really makes it sink in.

In 2011, Saudi Arabia gave women the right to vote, but their first opportunity to do so didn’t come for four years: In December 2015, less than a year ago, Saudi Arabian women cast a vote for the first time.

Consider these facts, from the BBC:

  • The election was segregated: Women and men had to vote in different polling stations.
  • Women are not allowed to drive in Saudi Arabia, so they had to find other ways to get to their polling stations.
  • The legislation is part of King Abdullah’s legacy. He says it needed to happen because women “have demonstrated positions that expressed correct opinions and advice.”
  • While 2015 marked the first time women in Saudi Arabia could vote, it also marked the first time women could run for election.
  • While campaigning, Saudi Arabian women must stand behind a partition or be represented by a man.

Of the 2,100 open council positions, women won 20 of those seats.

Check out some of the photos Saudi Arabian women shared on Twitter after voting:

da7eyat hatoon mozah salmaLucky, lucky us: The United States makes it much easier to vote. Are you registered? As part of tomorrow’s National Voter Registration Day, Citilink and the Fort Wayne Area League of Women Voters is sponsoring Get on the Voter Bus from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Citilink station at the corner of Calhoun and Baker streets. You can register to vote on the bus!

citilinkDon’t want to get on the bus? In Indiana, you can register online …

  • Get our Indiana voter registration form right here
    • You can also check to make sure you’re registered there. I did, and I am!

… by mail …

… or in person.

Happy registering!

reg-sticker

Latino student group to host Piñata Party

WHAT:
¡G.O.A.L. y Amigos!, which stands for Graduating Outstanding Achieving Latinos & Friends, is hosting a Piñata Party as part of its Hispanic Heritage Month celebration. Students will learn about the history of piñatas and break theirs open.

WHERE:
Student Life Center gymnasium
North Campus
3701 Dean Drive
Fort Wayne, IN 46835
Get directions

SCHEDULE:
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday

jr-presenting

Jamal Robinson of DESIAR Eyewear wins 2016 New Venture Competition

Jamal Robinson has been named the sixth champion of Ivy Tech Community College Northeast’s New Venture Competition, which took place Thursday evening on Ivy Tech Northeast’s Coliseum Campus. He won $35,000 in capital for his business, DESIAR Eyewear.

Robinson

Robinson

Robinson sold his first pair of DESIAR Eyewear in 2012, and he calls 2014 “the game changing year” for the company: That’s when companies like Luxottica (the largest eyewear company in the world), TJX (Europe’s version of TJ Maxx), and The Aldo Group began to carry DESIAR sunglasses.

With the $35,000 he wins from the New Venture Competition, he will launch his Hoosier line of eyewear, which feature wooden frames and are entirely manufactured in Indiana.

He and two other finalists presented their business plans to a room full of community business people, and he says he felt confident during his presentation.

“When it comes to DESIAR, I know DESIAR,” says Robinson, an Ivy Tech Northeast alum who graduated from IPFW with his associate degree in business. “With all that, I felt comfortably prepared. I was confident I did the best I could do.”

Robinson presented his business plan to more than 30 community professionals, who served as judges. The other finalists were Andrew Smittie, of Green E-Waste Miracles, which collects items trash companies won’t pick up like computers and technology and recycles the material; and Guadalupe Callejas, of Metro Striping & More, an interior and exterior painting company. Callejas was also a finalist in last year’s New Venture Competition.

Each finalist presented for 15 minutes. After the presentations, judges were given an additional 15 minutes for a question-and-answer session. The judges had been provided the contestants’ business plans prior to the event.

In its sixth year, the New Venture Competition’s presenting sponsor was Dave and Mary Bear of JB Tool, Die & Engineering Inc., and was also made possible through a grant from the Edward M. and Mary McCrea Wilson Foundation. The awards dinner sponsor was ProFed Federal Credit Union, and the competition was in collaboration with Fort Wayne SCORE.

Learn more about the New Venture Competition at IvyTech.edu/northeast/newventure, where you can also watch short videos with Robinson, Smittie, and Callejas. Learn more about studying entrepreneurship at Ivy Tech Northeast at IvyTech.edu/study-entrepreneurship.

Jamal Robinson won $35,000 on Thursday night at Ivy Tech Northeast’s 2016 New Venture Competition, in its sixth year. Robinson is the founder of DESIAR Eyewear. From left: James Tolbert, Ivy Tech Northeast business administration assistant professor; Robinson; Doug Wood, PNC Bank regional president; Karen Potter, ProFed Credit Union assistant vice president, commercial services; and Jerrilee K. Mosier, Ivy Tech Northeast chancellor.

Jamal Robinson won $35,000 on Thursday night at Ivy Tech Northeast’s 2016 New Venture Competition, in its sixth year. Robinson is the founder of DESIAR Eyewear. From left: James Tolbert, Ivy Tech Northeast business administration assistant professor; Robinson; Karen Potter, ProFed Credit Union assistant vice president, commercial services; Doug Wood, PNC Bank regional president; and Jerrilee K. Mosier, Ivy Tech Northeast chancellor.

Vote online & help Wabash Campus win $1k for a lucky student

Ivy Tech Wabash Campus is trying to win $1,000, and you could help it!

Each year, Beacon Credit Union, which has locations around northeast Indiana, hosts Project Spotlight, the credit union’s “community support program designed to discover worthwhile projects in each area that Beacon serves. Our hope is to be able to support community projects both large and small, and bring awareness to the many good things happening in our communities every day.”

Pam Guthrie, Wabash Campus’ site director, nominated a project, and it is currently in the running for one of three monetary prizes. If Wabash wins, the money will be used for a student scholarship–won’t you help? You can vote once per day, so don’t forget to return tomorrow … and the next day … and the next day.

The contest is open through Sept. 30.

VOTE HERE.
Scroll until you find “Ivy Tech Community College Wabash Instructional Site,” and click the “Select This Organization” button. Then you can help promote Project Spotlight on your social media channels.

Thanks for your help–wish us luck!

Ivy Tech Northeast to support displaced ITT students seeking transfer, completion options with Sept. 23-24 events

With the recent closing of ITT Technical Institute and many students in our community directly impacted as they work toward a college degree, Ivy Tech Community College Northeast will be hosting two events next week for students seeking transfer and completion options.

Friday, September 23
At Ivy Tech Northeast’s Student Life Center
North Campus, 3701 Dean Drive, Fort Wayne, IN 46835
11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Info sessions scheduled at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., and 3 p.m.

Saturday, September 24
At Ivy Tech Northeast’s Student Life Center
North Campus, 3701 Dean Drive, Fort Wayne, IN 46835
9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Info sessions scheduled at 9 a.m., 11 a.m., and Noon

Information sessions will last 15 minutes with a time for questions at the end. The session will cover options for credit review, financial aid support opportunities, and enrollment information.

Following each information session:

  • Academic programs will host breakout sessions in order for students to speak with individuals in their program of study.
  • Financial Aid and enrollment specialists will be on-hand to help students who would like to enroll the same day.
  • Academic advisors will be available to meet with students.
  • Testing Center will be available, as necessary.

If individuals previously attended Ivy Tech Community College and currently have a balance due with the College, relief options may be available to help support them. Certain fees for the testing out of courses may be eligible for waiver.

To RSVP for one of these events, go to bit.ly/itt2ivy or call 260-480-4268.

For additional information ITT students can go online at IvyTech.edu/itt.

Latino student group to host Salsa/Merengue Night

DETAILS:
Ivy Tech  Northeast students and community members are invited to learn the dance the salsa/merengue with ¡G.O.A.L. y Amigos!, which stands for Graduating Outstanding Achieving Latinos & Friends.

Casual dress is encouraged, including sneakers or soft-soled shoes. A canned food donation is also encouraged!

The student group aims to promote identity and unity of Latino students at Ivy Tech Community College Northeast through education and politics, social, and cultural awareness; increase visibility of Latino students and their involvement in campus and community activities; and to include and embrace non-Latinos who are interested in positive engagement with the Latino culture.

WHEN:
5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Oct. 12

5:30 p.m.: Meet and greet
6 to 7 p.m.: Lessons
7 to 8:30 p.m.: Practice what’s been learned

WHERE:
Student Life Center gymnasium
North Campus, Ivy Tech Community College Northeast
3701 Dean Drive
Fort Wayne, IN 46835

Happy Grandparents Day!

While plenty of students at Ivy Tech Northeast are parents, those who are grandparents don’t often get as much limelight. So to celebrate Grandparents Day, we introduce you to a student who is also a grandparent, Julie Lowry.

Julie has five grandchildren from ages 9 years to 6 weeks, and she shared a little about them for us:

Julie Lowry, a hospitality administration student, with her granddaughter, Marleigh

Julie Lowry, a hospitality administration student, with her granddaughter, Marleigh, who is 6 weeks old

I lived with my daughter Jayne and her three kids when I started at Ivy Tech. I was a stay-at-home grandma, and my daughter supported me in return. We lived together for 2 1/2 years, so my relationship is probably a little different than most grandparents: I couldn’t just spoil them and send them home!

The biggest lesson I taught my grandchildren is probably resiliency. They have seen that no matter the circumstances, you can come back from it. I remember my oldest granddaughter saying to me when I first started at Ivy Tech, “Grandma, I didn’t know old people could go to college!!”

Something else they probably learned from me was determination. I didn’t have to say a word: They watched me study, saw me stress over that stupid math class, and somehow pull off a B! The funny thing is, I really didn’t have to say anything at all. I set the example, and they were watching. It was pretty cool.

The biggest secret to having a good relationship with your grandkids is to be involved in their lives. I go to all the soccer games, Wildcat games, school programs, and more. They all love to play chef (I am studying hospitality administration) and are getting pretty good at it.

I’m probably harder on my grandkids than a normal grandparent because I was the caregiver for so long. I asked my son if he thought I was harder on him and his sister than I am on the grandkids, and he said, “For sure.” But my grandkids definitely listen to me better!

Happy Grandparents Day, Julie!

Julie’s grandkids. Click on images to zoom and for caption info.